Tag: leadership

Your Intelligence Makes You Invaluable

Have you ever felt like you had nothing to offer… no gifts to share whatsoever?

During spells of frustration or despair, it’s common to feel worthless… powerless. It can seem that everyone else is far more brilliant, beautiful, qualified and worthy of consideration. In times like these, take solace in The one thing you can offer that no one else can: your unique perspective.

You see, nobody looks at the world the way you do, nor thinks in exactly the same way. Once you start to engage your innate intelligence, be it simple and from the heart or complex and of the mind, your unique creativity begins to shine, and you become a beacon of brilliance.

You may be sitting on the one solution that no one else can imagine, or you may hold just the right words to bring comfort and understanding to a tense situation. You never know until you start to apply your mind, your perspective and your creativity to something outside yourself.

And sometimes, you don’t even need to EXPRESS your intelligence. Consider the CEO who sits with her team leaders, intently listening to their ideas until brilliance is born. By simply sitting in active contemplation, you magically amplify the collective intelligence.

How will YOU influence the world TODAY?

Schedule a complimentary coaching consultation to unlock your talent today!

6 Steps to Jumpstart Your Career Transition

In the past month, I have seen an increased demand for career transition coaching.

This tells me one of three things: either I’ve been farther off the grid than I realized (entirely possible!), or unemployment is actually higher than the reported 4% (US Bureau Labor Statistics), or significantly more people are disengaged and dissatisfied enough with their current jobs that they are considering alternatives. I believe it’s the latter. In my experience as an organizational development practitioner and executive coach, employees who are fully satisfied and fully engaged in what they see as meaningful work do not seek career transitions until circumstances change.

The good news is we can identify those areas of satisfaction and engagement that most closely align to our personal values and mission. If you or someone you know recognizes this situation to be true, there is hope for a fulfilling career ahead, whether in the current role or in a completely different space. The challenge, however, often comes in knowing what steps to take in pursuit of this path. These 6 Steps will assist you in jumpstarting the next phase of your career.

  1. Identify the Target: Sometimes the biggest obstacle is identifying what will bring increased satisfaction, engagement, fulfillment and joy in a career. There are many ways to accomplish this, including assessments, self-reflection, sabbaticals, conversations with trusted advisors, and exploring options with a coach. For some people, the change may be as simple as changing responsibilities or roles, while others may need to explore other organizations, even other professional fields. By knowing the target – what would actually bring joy, your aim will be true, as well as the efficiency and effectiveness of your effort.
  2. Create (or Enhance) Your Personal Brand: If you don’t know what this means, run a web search on your name and see what comes up. Imagine yourself as a recruiter or hiring manager looking to hire you, what do the results say about you as a candidate? What do you want the recruiter or hiring manager to see, think, know about you, based on your online presence? In my workshop, participants are often surprised at perceptions about their virtual profiles, especially those who are just entering the workforce or early in career. On the other end of the spectrum, some clients are shocked at the potential effects of having no online presence. Be objective, and then be intentional.
  3. Update Your Profile: In addition to beefing up your online presence, it is imperative to have a current resume and cover letter template, which may be customized to highlight qualifications that address the target job description. In addition, the LinkedIn profile should be refreshed and consistent with the resume. It’s a small thing, but it matters. Think of the cover letter as your first impression. It’s your first opportunity to state clearly what attracts you to the position for which you are applying, what qualifies you for consideration, and then request further discussion in the interview.
  4. Practice Interviewing: There is no substitute for practicing interview skills. Once you know the target, launched an arrow in the form of your application package (including cover letter, resume and profile), and scheduled the interview, your focus will shift to how you will represent yourself, your qualifications and your differentiators. How will you stand out from other candidates? What narratives will you share to convey your expertise, your experience, and your values? By practicing potential interview questions, not only do you reduce (not eliminate!) the element of surprise, but the responses and stories become more fluid, more natural, more authentic, which may help you relax a bit during the actual interview.
  5. Create a Successful Transition Plan: Even when change is an improvement in one’s circumstances, it can still be challenging, messy and even painful. By creating a transition plan, you will think through, plan for and mitigate the inherent obstacles, as well as prepare for those unexpected surprises that inevitably pop up during times of change. My clients develop a 90-day Successful Transition Plan, in which they envision what a successful transition means to them, ensure those satisfaction criteria are met and reduce any anxiety associated with making the change. This includes bringing the current role to a mutually agreeable and beneficial conclusion, and setting oneself up for success in the future position.
  6. Live the Dream: Now that you have embarked into the next phase of your career journey, it is good and right to celebrate! Then reflect on what went well, what to improve and how to ensure those satisfaction criteria continue to be achieved. Make course corrections early. Maintain relationships that have been built and fostered over time, and of course, build new ones. You never know how important your network is until you need it.

During the month of October, I am offering my 6-Week Career JumpStart Program at a special reduced rate, in response to the high volume demand for Career Coaching services. Transition seekers who sign up before October 31, 2017 save over 40%!! This program includes six weekly coaching sessions, which guide clients toward achieving their successful career transition objectives. This program is designed for recent college graduates starting a new career, entrepreneurs launching a business, mid-career professionals seeking greater satisfaction or making a complete career shift. This process will help participants to be intentional about their search, to polish up a resume and cover letter, to enhance social media presence, to practice interviewing skills and to create a successful transition plan, all in service to achieving that personal mission.

Click here or contact us today to learn more!

Standing at the Precipice

Here I stand at the precipice of a new adventure – one I never would have predicted. My journey has included many twists, turns, peaks, valleys, heartaches and thrill rides. However, this next challenge will require courage of leaving what is secure and familiar, in favor of travel and research for the benefit of sea turtles and STEM interns everywhere!

Growing up on the San Joaquin River Delta, I have always been a water baby. Whether camping at the beach, deep sea fishing with my parents, waterskiing with friends and siblings, or simply relaxing on the boat, being on or near the water has always been my favorite place of peace, comfort and solace. However, my love, respect, and healthy fear of the ocean, and specifically large creatures with big teeth, prevented me from learning to scuba dive and pursuing a career in Marine Biology.  Instead, I discovered I had a keen interest  in observing human behavior, and specifically understanding how adult human beings learn. Consequently, I went on to study education and instructional design. For the past 20 years, my professional career has been relatively secure, focused on designing corporate learning solutions to address the various challenges and competencies required for successful business leadership development. 

Eight years ago, I made the decision to face my greatest fear: I was going to learn to scuba dive or literally die trying! Knowledge Reviews were fairly straightforward. Learning the skills in the pool came quite naturally. After gearing up, walking directly into the ocean, and being slapped in the face with that first icy wave, I realized I had a conscious choice to make. Fortunately, I chose to press on, trust my instructor, and rely on my training to get through this certification. Anyone who dives the Breakwater in Monterey in April knows that there are days when visibility can be spectacular. This was not one of those days. After a 200 yard surface swim out to the buoy, students were instructed to descend in buddy pairs with the instructional staff, kneel on the bottom, grasping the marker line and wait for our turn to demonstrate the skills. Visibility might have been 2 feet that day, due to sand churned up from surf and surge. Remarkably, I was quite relaxed, holding the line and waiting for my instructor’s hand to emerge and signal the skill for me to perform.  While this was not my first (nor my last) learning edge, it certainly has been a pivotal one. And I am ever grateful for the whole new world that was opened up to me that day. In fact, I love it so much that I now have the privilege of introducing others to the wonder of our marine environments by teaching scuba. 

Today, it is not by accident that I stand at the precipice of a whole new adventure. I have resigned the security of my full time job in corporate learning and leadership development, in pursuit of what appears to be the intersection of my passions:  leadership, learning, ocean and environmental stewardship. This week I will embark on a new adventure, no doubt filled with daily lessons, challenges, struggles, discoveries, friendships and opportunities. This new adventure marks a merging of my passions for the benefit of doctoral research, as I have the privilege to participate in an international internship to explore the efficacy of developing leaders in STEM fields through hands-on practical field research. While the work with sea turtles is not the primary research, it will be the work of my internship. However, my real research contributions will be to measure the efficacy of the program, understanding aspects like: How are participants impacted by the experience? How does it shape future choices to become marine ecologists, conservationists, socially and ecologically responsible citizens of this blue marble? Will they continue to pursue careers in STEM fields? To what degree will they be transformed by the experience? What will make the program even more effective? How are leaders in STEM fields developed?

It is my hope and intention that this internship experience will inform my doctoral research, focusing at the intersection of Leadership, Social Responsibility and Ecological Sustainability. Simultaneously, this internship coincides with #100DaysofBlue, during which I will be documenting the effects of being near, on, in, or under water. I invite you to accompany me on this journey virtually, by following my blog here, or sponsor this project on GoFundMe.

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Develop or Become Obsolete: Part III – Your Leadership Development

In my last post in this series, I wrote about Professional Development as an intentional focus on learning skills to be successful in business. Leadership Development, on the other hand, focuses on learning how to enlist, inspire, influence, guide and direct teams or individuals toward some predetermined result or outcome. This is not to be confused with Management, which is more focused on process and policy.  

Whether we are leading our teams, families, communities or ourselves, we can practice, practice, practice the skills of leadership. We can enlist people in our ideas. We can influence decisions and outcomes. We can inspire and motivate others to become their best selves. We in fact have an impact on performance, merely thru what we choose, say and do. One CEO refers to the “leader in everyone”, and in fact the leader expectations in his company are built around this idea.   

The good news is Leadership skills can be developed. Using the 70-20-10 model of development, only about 10% (or less) of leadership is learned through traditional modes: classroom, books, even videos or CBT’s. These traditional modes of learning serve as the seed of learning, whereas the 20% represents learning through others, such as networking, mentoring, coaching, offering good and bad examples of behavior. Ultimately, 70% of learning takes place on the job, in the role with real people on real teams with real consequences. This requires constant experimentation and feedback, followed by adjustment. It truly is the trial and error method of learning. The downside of this is that potential consequences of mistakes are also very real, especially to those on the receiving end of the impact. Leaders who are learning on the fly must also be incredibly humble, receptive to feedback, and sensitive to how their behaviors are experienced by others. At the bottom line is the leadership style building and creating trust or eroding and damaging it?

The reality is high performing individual contributors are often promoted to supervisory and management positions, long before they have developed a sense of their own leadership style, philosophy or approach. By contrast, professional athletes learn and perfect their skills and techniques on the practice field, years, even decades, before making it to “the big show”. It takes practice, practice, practice, with professional coaches, feedback from teammates, constant self-evaluation, experimentation and adjustment to perfect their skills. Can you imagine if professional athletes had to learn and hone their skills in the job in a real, high stakes competition when the scores count? 

For this reason, we all must develop leadership capability long before we have a supervisory position. Our choices, attitudes and behaviors reflect who we really are and how we will lead others in the future. Some of the most influential leaders in my life were not the people in positional power, but rather the people around me who cared enough to provide honest and candid feedback about my performance, my attitude, perceptions of others about me and challenged my thinking when I needed it.  

Whether we are leading our teams, families, communities or ourselves, we can practice, practice, practice the skills of leadership. We can enlist people in our ideas. We can influence decisions and outcomes. We can inspire and motivate others to become their best selves. We in fact have an impact on performance, merely thru what we choose, say and do. Further, we can invite and receive feedback graciously, by receiving it as an opportunity for becoming even more effective.

Regardless whether you are a new graduate just beginning your career, a mid-career professional transitioning to management or a seasoned executive, there is always improvement to be made in terms of how teams and organizations perceive and follow you. You can always be more effective, more impactful, more compassionate, more dynamic, more ….. (you fill in the blank). Feedback is the gift that helps you to identify what additional practice is necessary.

  • For those just entering the workforce, practice patience. Practice listening. Practice adapting your style to the needs of others. Practice inquiry. Practice giving clear, objective and caring feedback that helps others. All of these will serve you well. 
  • For all leaders at every level, be mindful of what your people need to remain motivated, inspired, engaged. Learn how to adapt your style to the needs of your team members in each situation. Be intentional about connecting your team’s contributions to the broader strategy. Reward good performance. Recognize and celebrate accomplishments. Say thank you. Keep learning. 
  • For executives, stay humble and remember what got you here will not get you to the next level. Whether by design or by default, you will have an impact. You will leave a legacy with those who follow. How do you want to be remembered? Take the opportunity to be intentional about how others experience you.

For more information on leadership development and coaching programs, visit Blue Horizon Solutions or schedule your complimentary coaching consultation today. 

Join our Leadership Mastermind Group: This special coaching group is designed especially for experienced business leaders to discuss complex business challenges with other like-minded executives for perspective, alternatives, insight and collaboration on a monthly basis. Sign up before April 15th and save 15%!

Develop or Become Obsolete: Part II – Your Professional Development

“Develop or Become Obsolete!” was the rally cry of a former HR executive during a season of intense organizational change. It was his way of encouraging us to become greater than we ever imagined.  As stated in my last post,  this quote has become a foundation of what I believe it takes for business professionals (or athletes, for that matter) to remain competitive and successful contenders at the top of their game over time.  We must continually learn, develop, grow and expand our skill sets, so that we may not only keep up with our customer demands, but also outpace our competition.

My coaching clients are typically focused on development in one (or a combination) of four domains: Personal, Professional, Leadership or Business. Today we will continue this four-part series with a focus on Professional Development.

Professional Development

No matter what role we play in society or position we take in business, our jobs require us know and do certain things, even beyond the technical skills. To be successful in any kind of business, we must learn how to have intelligent business conversations, make decisions, negotiate contracts, deliverables and timelines, manage projects, run meetings, develop and deliver presentations, and sell our products. We must learn the business of conducting business.

For example, when we teach interns to become professional employees, the key differentiators are communication, teamwork and influencing skills. There are fundamental skills that professionals must learn without exception, and then there are the professional skills that truly differentiate one person from the rest. We expect our employees not only to show up, deliver results and submit reports. We also expect them to build rapport with stakeholders and customers, communicate with management and team members, and influence colleagues without authority. At first, some of these professional skills might seem awkward or unnatural. But the reality is those who develop mastery in these “soft skills” receive more recognition and promote faster. Moreover, these are the professionals who get invited by leaders to participate in mentoring, interesting projects, both developing their capability and accelerating their success.

The same is true in any profession. 

There are technical skills, and there are the key differentiators. What are the skills that truly set people apart from the competition in your field of expertise?

One of the most frequently asked questions I hear sounds something like this, “I need to add a professional development goal to my plan. What classes or workshops are coming up?”  Now, I like promoting my workshops as much as anyone. But classroom or traditional learning is only the seed. What matters most comes after the workshop: How is the seed fostered, watered, and nourished to grow? How is the new learning reported back to the team, applied on the job or given feedback?  What follow up support do you need to ensure growth of your newly developed skills?

The most often cited learning goal I hear is the need to develop presentation (or public speaking) skills. Of course, the research shows fear of public speaking is among the top 5 greatest fears people report (usually up there with death, spiders and snakes).  However, the good news is skills can be learned.  When clients ask me, “How do I develop public speaking skills?” Guess what I tell them. The best way to learn presentation skills is to give presentations.  They hate it. But they know it’s true.  So I recommend Toastmasters or Rotary clubs or other opportunities to stand up, express a thought and receive feedback.  In our Powerful Presentations workshops, participants will profile their audience, develop the message content, practice delivering the presentation, and receive feedback, including a video recording. Practice is vital.

Suggestions for Professional Development:

  • Read a book or subscribe to audio books. Not only do you learn interesting information, hear fascinating stories, but also you are developing a stronger vocabulary as a secondary benefit!
  • Take a class (or webinar). One tremendous benefit of being a knowledge worker society is we have access to more wonderful learning opportunities and experiences than we might have ever imagined.  Peruse our workshops on Powerful Presentations, Creating Your Brand, Leading in Times of Change, and the Ultimate Career Makeover to name a few. Follow me on social media for a plethora of suggested programs.
  • Check out your local Small Business Administration,  Chamber of Commerce or professional associations for additional offerings.
  • Tell your colleagues what you learned and ask them to give you feedback. For participants in my Powerful Presentations workshop, they must ask someone to observe them in meetings and give feedback when they present. This can be done with many different professional skills. This is particularly effective when experimenting or practicing new techniques.
  • Consider how you will apply new skills in your current job.  Post reminders around your workspace to prompt new thinking, new behaviors, and new habits.
  • Identify motivators. Be very clear about how this new skill will raise your game.  Tell people.
  • Find a mentor.  Identify someone who exemplifies the skill. Watch them. Ask them questions, observe their behavior and apply what works for you to your own situation.
  • Practice. Practice. Practice.  I played softball through college, and my dad would say, “What you do in practice is what you will do in the game. Make it count.”
  • Hire a coach. Elite athletes do it. Executive leaders do it. Sometimes only the coach is able to provide feedback that other stakeholders may not be willing or able to give. When performance is important enough to succeed, it’s worth the investment.
  • Don’t miss our special self-paced online Courage, Risks and Rewards Program, which we are offering at a special low price through the month of February.

Next time, I will continue the discussion with a focus on Leadership Development. Meanwhile, stay connected with us on social media, enroll in a workshop, contact us with your suggestions and feedback, or schedule a Complimentary Coaching Consultation to determine which solution best fits your needs.

©2017 Blue Horizon Solutions, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Develop or Become Obsolete: Part I – Your Personal Development

personal development concept on blackboard

Earlier in my career, I worked for a VP, Human Resources, who was fond of saying, “Develop or Become Obsolete!” He meant this for our own professional development, as much as for business strategy execution. While this bold statement initially caught me off guard, I learned that he was fostering a culture of continuous learning. He was challenging us to learn and practice as much as possible to stay competitive and successful. This quote has since become a staple in my own mental model of what it takes for business professional (or athletes, for that matter) to remain competitive and successful contenders at the top of their game over time.

Let’s face it! The world changes. The market shifts. Our customer needs and demands evolve. If we as business people are not prepared and even proactive about continuing to learn, develop, grow and expand our skill sets, we will be outpaced not only by customer demands, but also by our competitors. Another colleague uses a different metaphor: “Even if you are moving forward on the train tracks, the train will overtake you if you don’t outpace it.”

The same is true in learning and development. My coaching clients are typically focused on development in one (or a combination) of four domains: Personal, Professional, Leadership or Business Development. Over the coming weeks, I’ll address each of these topics in a four part series on development. Let’s start this week with Personal Development.

Personal Development

As much as we may try to “leave our personal stuff at home” when we go to work, the reality is we are whole human beings. Who we are outside of work – parent, spouse, partner, sibling, child, neighbor, community member, volunteer – is reflective of our identity, our values, our mission and purpose in life. Interestingly, it always finds a way to show up in our work lives, our leadership style and in our work performance. Similarly, who we are at work – leader, business owner, entrepreneur, professional – is also reflective of these aspects of self, including personality and aspiration. We are the common denominator in our own experience. The better able to reconcile these two aspects of self, the more equipped we can be to show up with our most authentic self when it matters most.  In fact, it is when we become clear on these intrinsic motivators and drivers, that we are able truly to unlock our highest potential.

Personal Development has to do with who you are as a person.  It often shows up in things like New Years Resolutions – lose weight, learn Spanish, exercise more, eat healthy. All of these are designed to create a better quality of life based on some intrinsic motivator, some value. What I find to be most interesting with my coaching clients is how these same motivators and values make their way into professional and leadership development conversations. When we attempt to separate or bifurcate our identities, we not only diminish all the good and right qualities we can demonstrate, but it also arguably leans toward psychological disorders and becomes unhealthy at its extreme.

Suggestions for Personal Development:

  • Give yourself permission to be a whole human being. Experiment with integrating your whole self into multiple aspects of life.
  • Meditate. Reflect. Journal. Pray. Whatever practice or methodology you choose, our brains require some form of “time out” to process, reflect, assimilate learning and grow. Brain research shows that similar to muscle development after a hard workout, the learning actually sticks when we give our brains time to reflect and process.
  • Set more challenging stretch goals for yourself. Then go achieve them! It’s amazing how alive it feels to cross the finish line on accomplishments, especially when you never imagined you could do it. It also sets a beautiful example to those around you.
  • Write down your goals and say them out loud. There is no greater accountability than when someone says, “Hey, I remember you were going to (fill in the blank with your goal here). How’s that going?” Tell people your goals, so they will celebrate with you when you achieve them.
  • Team up with someone to accomplish goals together! Join a team, choose a workout buddy, find an accountability partner.
  • Consider our Courage, Risks and Rewards Program, which we are offering at a special low price through the month of February.

Next time, I will continue the discussion with a focus on Professional Development. Meanwhile, stay connected with us on social media, contact us with your suggestions and feedback, check out our workshops or schedule a Complimentary Coaching Consultation to determine which solution best fits your needs.

©2017 Blue Horizon Solutions, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Give the Gift of Presence this Holiday Season!

5 Ways to Be Fully Present When it Matters Most

As we enter the holiday season, I am constantly reminded of the tradition of gift-giving as a means to celebrate prosperity, gratitude, family, love and many more personal reflections that accompany year-end. Whether you are making a list and checking it twice, or offering daily gifts over time throughout the season of lights, there is no greater gift than that of yourself. While there may be no tangible cost of sharing a bit of your true, authentic self with loved ones, friends, family, even colleagues and partners, it can require a bit of courage. There is an inherent vulnerability in exposing one’s true thoughts, feelings, and aspirations with other people, especially when the response is unpredictable.  However, the value of the gift is multiplied exponentially, and the returns are immeasurable.

Although the holidays can be incredibly hectic, stressful, exhausting and challenging at times, here are a few reminders to help you be fully present when it matters most.

5 Ways to Be Present during the Holidays

  • Equip yourself. Ensure that you are well-rested, well-hydrated and well-nourished, so that your physical being can support and sustain all of the emotional and mental demands that the season requires. This equips you to show up with your full and best energy when it matters most.
  • Be “there” physically, when possible. As the holiday song says, “There’s no place like Home for the Holidays.” There is something special about showing up in person, especially when it’s least expected. Wherever “Home” is for you, bring the gift of yourself and be there however you can. If that’s not possible, what is the next best alternative? a phone call? videocall? A personal, hand-written note?
  • Be in the moment. Disconnect from your devices. Step away from the smartphone. Set aside the agenda, the shopping list, the To-Do List. Focus on the people around you right then, right there, right now. Listen, observe, and absorb all that your interactions with others may offer.
  • Practice Mindfulness. Pay close attention to how you are experiencing the events as they unfold. Observe yourself in each situation and receive what it has to offer. Take a moment to reflect and gather your thoughts occasionally.
  • Learn from it. Every encounter offers a lesson. Some teach us how we can improve ourselves. Some teach us how we don’t want to be. Look for the lessons that help you to achieve your ultimate goals. Journaling or expressing these insights can also help in processing the lessons. Reflect on how you would like 2017 to be even more fruitful and productive.

Here’s wishing you all the hope, joy and peace you can handle throughout this holiday season and beyond. As always, please email or schedule time with me as needed. I look forward to reconnecting with you again in January for an incredible New Year!

Happy Holidays!!

Accessing the Power of Gratitude

The practice of gratitude as a tool for happiness has been in the mainstream for years. Long-term studies support gratitude’s effectiveness, suggesting that a positive, appreciative attitude contributes to greater success in work, greater health, peak performance in sports and business, a higher sense of well-being, and a faster rate of recovery from surgery.

But while we may acknowledge gratitude’s many benefits, it still can be difficult to sustain. So many of us are trained to notice what is broken, undone or lacking in our lives. And for gratitude to meet its full healing potential in our lives, it needs to become more than just a Thanksgiving word. We have to learn a new way of looking at things, a new habit. And that can take some time.

That’s why practicing gratitude makes so much sense. When we practice giving thanks for all we have, instead of complaining about what we lack, we give ourselves the chance to see all of life as an opportunity and a blessing.

Remember that gratitude isn’t a blindly optimistic approach in which the bad things in life are whitewashed or ignored. It’s more a matter of where we put our focus and attention. Pain and injustice exist in this world, but when we focus on the gifts of life, we gain a feeling of well-being. Gratitude balances us and gives us hope.

There are many things to be grateful for: colorful autumn leaves, legs that work, friends who listen and really hear, chocolate, fresh eggs, warm jackets, tomatoes, the ability to read, roses, our health, butterflies. What’s on your list?

Some Ways to Practice Gratitude

Keep a gratitude journal in which you list things for which you are thankful. You can make daily, weekly or monthly lists. Greater frequency may be better for creating a new habit, but just keeping that journal where you can see it will remind you to think in a grateful way.

  • Make a gratitude collage by drawing or pasting pictures.
  • Practice gratitude around the dinner table or make it part of your nighttime routine.
  • Make a game of finding the hidden blessing in a challenging situation.
  • When you feel like complaining, make a gratitude list instead. You may be amazed by how much better you feel.
  • Notice how gratitude is impacting your life. Write about it, sing about it, express thanks for gratitude.

As you practice, an inner shift begins to occur, and you may be delighted to discover how content and hopeful you are feeling. That sense of fulfillment is gratitude at work.

Happy Thanksgiving!!

Author’s content used under license, © 2011 Claire Communications

Top 10: Ways to Lead by Example

Good leaders must lead by example. Through their actions, which are aligned with what they say, they become a person others want to follow. When leaders say one thing but do another, they erode trust, a critical element of productive leadership. Here are 10 of the dozens of ways to lead by example.

1. Take responsibility. Blame costs you your credibility, keeps team members on the defensive and ultimately sabotages real growth.

2. Be truthful. Inaccurate representation affects everyone. Show that honesty really IS the best policy.

3. Be courageous. Walk through fire (a crisis) first. Take calculated risks that demonstrate commitment to a larger purpose.

4. Acknowledge failure. It makes it OK for your team to do the same and defines failure as part of the process of becoming extraordinary.

5. Be persistent. Try, try again. Go over, under or around any hurdles to show that obstacles don’t define your company or team.

6. Create solutions. Don’t dwell on problems; instead be the first to offer solutions and then ask your team for more.

7. Listen. Ask questions. Seek to understand. You’ll receive valuable insights and set a tone that encourages healthy dialogue.

8. Delegate liberally. Encourage an atmosphere in which people can focus on their core strengths.

9. Take care of yourself. Exercise, don’t overwork, take a break. A balanced team, mentally and physically, is a successful team. Model it, encourage it, support it!

10. Roll up your sleeves. Like Alexander the Great leading his men into battle, you’ll inspire greatness in your company.

 Learn. Lead.  Leave a Legacy.

 

Author’s content used under license, © 2011 Claire Communications